Some of us are born with outstanding talents. Some of us work hard to earn what they have.

Some of us are born mentally or physically disadvantaged.

And none of us have a choice.

Your birth condition is beyond intention and choice, and the choices you make in your life, that contribute to where you are today, have more to do with the situation you were in when making the decision, than to do your character, your attitude, and your experience.

It is tempting to conclude our success to our life choices and efforts. But what if everything we are, are results of our arbitrary innate qualities and talents that we are born without a choice of, and of our life choices and experience that are driven by our innate qualities and random chances, that all of these are beyond intention and reason? That your birth condition is beyond intention and choice, and that the choices you make in your life, that contribute to where you are today, have more to do with the situation you were in when making the decision, than to do with your character, your attitude, and your experience.

Social psychologists call this misattribution, and resulting false sense of entitlement, the fundamental attribution error, that we are placing an undue emphasis on our internal characteristics for our behaviour in a given situation, rather than considering external factors.

Maybe, no one should be allowed to take so much and leave so little for the rest.

There is no doubt that who we are takes a large part in what we do. But if at least a part of who we are and where we are today was beyond personal choice and intent.

And knowing that the more successful a person is, the more likely the person will attribute his success to his actions instead of the privileges that were simply given to him.

Then maybe, no one should be allowed to take so much and leave so little for the rest.